How did you get started doing what you do?
One aunt, two uncles and my grandfather are artists, and I was inspired by them. When I had to decide in school what I wanted to become, I set my mind on being an artist. I studied art straight after high school, but after just a half year I’ve found out that I was way too young (only 17 at the time) and I stopped before the year ended. After that I didn’t draw for almost 10 years.

It was an ad in a magazine for Der SPIEGEL which inspired me to pick up my pencils again. I still don’t know who this piece was made by, but when I’m lost of inspiration, I just have to take a look at it. It also started my crosshatching style.

Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz
Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz

How would you describe your creative style?
My style is called crosshatching and essentially it’s just a bunch of straight lines in different directions to create various shades of grey.

What’s your inspiration?
I watch a lot of movies, series and TV, read books and magazines, listen to music. Sometimes it comes from the strangest things, sometimes you really have to search. Just about everything can inspire one.

Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz
Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz
Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz

How do you keep motivated?
Usually I don’t need much to motivate myself. As soon as I pick up my pen and draw the first line the next one just follows. If I’m stuck I’ll start on another part of the drawing and in the end everything comes together somehow.

How have others reacted to your work?
I’m really blessed with all the kind words people say about my work. Sometimes they can’t believe it’s all drawn by hand and from a distance they think my works are black and white pictures. When they come nearer they see all the small lines and are even more astonished. It is always nice to receive response to your work (even more so if it’s positive) and inspire one.

Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz
Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
Draw/design/paint what is close to you; if you like cars, design cars, if you like cows, draw or paint cows. And practice so much that you can!

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
At the moment I’m working on dry-point printmaking, but really just started. My dad built a printing press for me (thanks Dad!) and now it’s time to start practicing. If you draw analog, it’s always hard to reproduce your work, there is only one original. Of course you can scan the piece and print it, but it will never be the same as the original. With dry-point printmaking it is possible to make ten to twenty original copies of one copper plate and this concept really speaks to me. Also, I think my crosshatching style really fits the medium.

Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz
Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz

What art supplies do you use?
I use Rotring Rapidographs which work really nice. It’s good to have different sizes, I’m switching between 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. All my pens have custom made shafts (made by my dad) out of 6 square massive aluminum. They give me the weight and stability that the normal plastic Rotring shafts doesn’t give. The cartridges are easy to change and doesn’t require many maintenance. The more I use the pen the better I get to know it- how it flows, how deep the color is and how to get exactly the things out of it that I want/need.

My choice of Paper is Hahnemühle 1584 Skizze 190gr/m2 and at the moment I’m using Molotow Aqua Twins Markers in multiple grey tones.

Interview with illustrator, Rik Reimert on Jung Katz

What’s your process like?
My workflow is pretty straightforward. When I’ve decided what or who I want to draw I start researching. The next thing is sketching, just with a pencil so I still can erase and change. When I’m happy with my sketch it’s time to pick up my Rotring Rapidographs pens and start filling in. I work from dark to light and try to use only straight lines.

Follow Rik Reimert on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr.

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Posted by:Casey Webb

Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Jung Katz, as well as Editor for ZIIBRA.

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