How did you get started doing what you do?
I started drawing when I was 3 or 4. I was very good at it so I kept doing it.

How would you describe your creative style?
I draw in the style of early Renaissance Flemish Masters egg-tempera paintings, using tiny cross-hatched lines to build up form. My imagery is somewhere between real & surreal, on a grand scale. I only draw in black & white.

What’s your inspiration?
The 21st Century.

Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz
Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz

What is art to you?
It inspired me as a child & woke me up to my self, my feelings, and the world around me… like a metaphysical alarm clock.

What does your typical day look like?
I eat my breakfast, answer my emails, check my FB Fan page, then draw. Lunch, then draw. Snack, then draw. Sleep.

How long does it typically take for you to finish a piece?
Depends on the size of the piece. One of my 6foot x 12foot drawings takes me around 5 months if I work every day on it for at least 6 hours a day.

How do you keep motivated?
Drawing is bliss to me. I need the motivation to stop myself in order to see friends, buy food, and sleep.

Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz
Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz

How would you say your surroundings have influenced your work?
I have lived in 6 different countries but the only way my surroundings have influenced my work has been the size of my studio. My drawings are as big as my studio allows.

What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
I wish to astound myself.

How have others reacted to your work?
Astounded. You can’t really see the impact of a highly detailed, 9 foot x 12 foot disturbing image on a computer screen… though people have also been astounded there too.

Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz
Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz

What do you want others to take away from your work?
The same thing I would like to take away from art, books, film, music, etc: inspiration, astonishment, wonder, awe and/or recognition.

What, if anything, would you tell your younger self?
Buy Apple shares.

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?
Shut-up and draw.

Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz
Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
Unless you’re willing to work your butt off in your chosen media, forget it.

What are your thoughts on art school?
It was a necessary evil. Although it taught me virtually nothing (I went to Carnegie-Mellon University when Abstract & Conceptual Art were fashionable), it gave me an oasis of time in which to experiment & find my passion.

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
I would like to be commissioned by a State Museum to do a drawing the size of a large room.

Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz
Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz

What’s your dream project?
A drawing the size of a large room.

What art supplies do you use?
Pencil, charcoal pencil, and paper.

What’s your process like?
I work on a cartoon, erasing for the first few weeks to get it right, and then I put on headphones and dive into it.

Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz
Interview with artist, Laurie Lipton on Jung Katz

How could the art industry become better in your opinion?
Show more women artists in the State Museums and allow more women to run major spaces.

Follow Laurie Lipton on Facebook and Twitter.

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Posted by:Casey Webb

Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Jung Katz, as well as Editor for ZIIBRA.

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