How did you get started doing what you do?
I remember that as a young girl I so much liked to cut images from magazines to paste them into school agendas, scrapbooks and even on my bedroom door. Add to this the fascination I always had for walls filled with old posters, flaking paint, scrappy billboards and weathered paint: it opened an unexpected door for completely new opportunities. Completely unintended I found a new way of working that I felt pleasurably and comfortably at home in. What started out as copying old walls with worn out posters has grown into many series of new visual storytelling. Not simply just eclecticism, but bringing together many seemingly incoherent storylines into one completely new story, my own personal story.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

How would you describe your creative style?
I assemble original photography, assorted papers, acrylics, oil, charcoal, ink, and pencil in my works. The variety of resources I am able to use has proved indispensable to me. The biggest challenge the collage medium posed was its unforgiving lack of transparency. Finding a way to replicate the effects of transparency afforded by paint, especially watercolors, was a large victory for me. The preparing labor shows through in my collages; layer upon layer of material remains visible in the finished pieces. I believe my body of work is characterized by my skill for reinvention. Having always loved the appearance of weathered walls plastered with peeling paint and old posters, I revive this aesthetic with hopefully a keen and professional eye. The creative objective of my work is to “make something beautiful out of dilapidation.” My tableaus explore the dissonance between old and new materials, intertwined in the most beautiful way possible to create dreamlike and melancholy images.

NEW YORK SKYLINE 1948

What’s your inspiration?
There are two very important elements in my work, which I always use to shape my art: weathered walls with posters, peeling paint and all kinds of things into dilapidation. And images that I’ve seen in psychological thrillers. One of my great passions.

What is art to you?
Art is my life. I see art everywhere I go. Outside in the city, in nature, in people. Inside when I see a movie, hear a song or read a book.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

What does your typical day look like?
My day always starts early. First a breakfast with my husband. Then I’m going to do a half-hour interval workout on the bike outside in nature to have a fresh start. I try to do this every day. After a cup of coffee, I do my daily routine chores. Around 11:00 in the morning, I go to my studio and start my working day, usually until about 16:00-17:00. The evenings I usually use to edit photos, post photos and update all platforms where you can see my artwork. This is a very strict routine, also on weekends. I’ve got three children so this is the only way to get on enough hours each day in order to paint.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

How long does it typically take for you to finish a piece?
For small works on paper I need a day or two or three to finish. For larger works I need about two weeks.

How do you keep motivated?
Of course selling my artwork is the best motivation one can have. But looking through magazines, watching movies, going outside to take pictures is just as good a motivation. And very important; the positive reaction from people watching my artwork.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

How would you say your surroundings have influenced your work?
Unfortunately, I got into bad weather financially several years ago. For a while I just couldn’t afford expensive canvasses and paint. I had to do with what I had left. But I just had to paint and wanted to create art no matter what. So I looked around for what I had and could use. What I had was many different sorts of paper and an endless number of old photographs, postcards, magazine images and similar stuff. I suddenly remembered that as a young girl I so much liked to cut images from magazines to paste them into school agendas, scrapbooks and even on my bedroom door. Add to this the fascination I always had for walls filled with old posters, flaking paint, scrappy billboards and weathered paint, it opened an unexpected door for completely new opportunities. Completely unintended I found a new way of working, I felt pleasurably and comfortably at home in. What started out as copying old walls with worn out posters has grown into many series of new visual storytelling.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
I would love to develop an as-large-as-possible audience all over the word that will be touched and moved by the creations I make.

How have others reacted to your work?
I am very surprised and delighted by the positive feedback on my work. The most important comment that I’ve heard from one of my followers is that my work has its own recognizable style.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

What do you want others to take away from your work?
I would really appreciate it if people see the deeper layers in my work. I try to tell a story about people. Mostly about their loneliness and being alone. About silence and emptiness.

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?
Someone once told me that I had to keep making my own work and should not get distracted by the works of others.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

What art supplies do you use?
Because I’m a mixed media artist, I use many different supplies. The surfaces that I use are canvas, board, paper, wood, cardboard and panel.
The materials I use to create an artwork are: acrylic, watercolor, Indian ink, charcoal, pencil, ballpoint pen, paper, newspaper, and magazine. I also use all kinds of waste material to stamp or stick on my works.

Interview with collage artist, db Waterman

What’s your process like?
Initially it lacked the one thing that is important to me, the transparency that normally only is possible with the use of watercolor. The unforgiving layering of transparent watercolors is a challenge I would not want to miss, and after a lot of trial and error I finally succeeded in getting the collages as transparent as a watercolor. Every layer of paper, oil, acrylic, pencil, crayon, ballpoint, watercolor, ink, charcoal and whatever else I use, remains visible in the artwork.

Follow d.b. Waterman on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr!

 

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Posted by:Casey Webb

Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Jung Katz, as well as Editor for ZIIBRA.

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