Tell us about yourself, who you are, where you’re from and what you do…
When I look at an object, like a dress or a shoe, I don’t only see a piece of clothing – I see an instrument. When that piece of clothing is moved through the video frame the movement becomes choreography. When I create new audiovisual work this is my perspective on the world. It’s a transformation process which reveals music and dance beneath the surface of mundane reality.

Tell us about your friend, Nicole Roscher…
Nicole has an avant garde aesthetic which is simultaneously androgynous, feminine, brutal, baroque, goth, trashy and haute couture all at once. She is my personal style guru. The week I met her she appeared on The Sartorialist wearing a signature oversize pullover she designed herself. Nicole is impulsive, daring and fearless.

What inspired this project?
I am interested in the idea of hypercubist identity – in the notion of a multifaceted self. In Faces of N. I wanted to create a portrait which shows how clothing can alter how we feel about ourselves and how others perceive us. I also found it interesting to show Nicole, who is a professional model and fashion designer, in her own wardrobe. It became a puzzle: what does this outfit sound like? What does that outfit sound like? In the end it’s as much about depicting Nicole’s many sides as it is about my interpretation of her various identities through music.

Can you tell us a bit more about how you managed to create the audio entirely from the sound of clothes?
The sounds in Faces of N. are made 100% from the sounds of Nicole’s clothes. I developed my own granular synthesis technique to create the synthesizer tones. Percussion sounds involved some serious EQ work and ADSR envelope modulation.

How long does the average song/video take to create?
Faces of N. was recorded in March 2013. The EP was finished in early 2014. An additional several months were needed to build out the website, complete color correction, and finish audio mastering. Big thanks go to Cameron Askin who did an amazing job building the website. The Prelude to Faces of N. launched in March 2014 with the full website launching in August 2014.

Do you have any other projects by other artists that you’d like for others to check out?
I can imagine fans of this work will appreciate finding out about Nicole’s professional modeling portfolio as well as her label Von Bardonitzand her Berlin studio CAKE. The first collaboration I had together with Nicole was in 2012 when I created the 5-channel video installation The Tosso Variations. The Tosso Variations features the performances of my friend Shingo Inao on his self-made instrument wearing the Von Bardonitz “Oswald” pullover.

Check out the rest of the videos on Faces of N. and follow Gabriel Shalom on, Twitter and Behance!

You can also follow Jung Katz on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and Tumblr. Or subscribe to us via our RSS feed or Bloglovin’. Share this post using the buttons below!

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Posted by:Casey Webb

Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Jung Katz, as well as Editor for ZIIBRA.

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Tell us about yourself, who you are, where you’re from and what you do…
When I look at an object, like a dress or a shoe, I don’t only see a piece of clothing – I see an instrument. When that piece of clothing is moved through the video frame the movement becomes choreography. When I create new audiovisual work this is my perspective on the world. It’s a transformation process which reveals music and dance beneath the surface of mundane reality.

Tell us about your friend, Nicole Roscher…
Nicole has an avant garde aesthetic which is simultaneously androgynous, feminine, brutal, baroque, goth, trashy and haute couture all at once. She is my personal style guru. The week I met her she appeared on The Sartorialist wearing a signature oversize pullover she designed herself. Nicole is impulsive, daring and fearless.

What inspired this project?
I am interested in the idea of hypercubist identity – in the notion of a multifaceted self. In Faces of N. I wanted to create a portrait which shows how clothing can alter how we feel about ourselves and how others perceive us. I also found it interesting to show Nicole, who is a professional model and fashion designer, in her own wardrobe. It became a puzzle: what does this outfit sound like? What does that outfit sound like? In the end it’s as much about depicting Nicole’s many sides as it is about my interpretation of her various identities through music.

Can you tell us a bit more about how you managed to create the audio entirely from the sound of clothes?
The sounds in Faces of N. are made 100% from the sounds of Nicole’s clothes. I developed my own granular synthesis technique to create the synthesizer tones. Percussion sounds involved some serious EQ work and ADSR envelope modulation.

How long does the average song/video take to create?
Faces of N. was recorded in March 2013. The EP was finished in early 2014. An additional several months were needed to build out the website, complete color correction, and finish audio mastering. Big thanks go to Cameron Askin who did an amazing job building the website. The Prelude to Faces of N. launched in March 2014 with the full website launching in August 2014.

Do you have any other projects by other artists that you’d like for others to check out?
I can imagine fans of this work will appreciate finding out about Nicole’s professional modeling portfolio as well as her label Von Bardonitzand her Berlin studio CAKE. The first collaboration I had together with Nicole was in 2012 when I created the 5-channel video installation The Tosso Variations. The Tosso Variations features the performances of my friend Shingo Inao on his self-made instrument wearing the Von Bardonitz “Oswald” pullover.

Check out the rest of the videos on Faces of N. and follow Gabriel Shalom on, Twitter and Behance!

You can also follow Jung Katz on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and Tumblr. Or subscribe to us via our RSS feed or Bloglovin’. Share this post using the buttons below!

Posted by:Casey Webb

Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Jung Katz, as well as Editor for ZIIBRA.

Comments

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