Artist Interview: Derek Daniel Reformat

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatTell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?
My name is Derek Daniel Reformat. I’ve been involved in art my entire life which can be divided into 3 phases. As a child growing up, it came in the form of art class at school. This included drawing, painting, and sculpting but was performed by assignment only. During college, I forwent art classes in favor of chemistry or biology but I kept a blue journal of sketches, which I still have. Some of those drawings went on to become inspiration for paintings later, which I began to take up while in medical school at New York University in 2007. I have been painting ever since.

Originally from Buffalo, NY, I have been living in New York City for 10 years now. I am in my 5th year of plastic surgery residency training at New York University.

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatHow would you describe your style?
Imagine F. Scott Fitzgerald hired an illustrator for one of his novels. Artistically, I would describe it as mildly abstract portraits or city/landscapes in a style where Art Nouveau meets Pop Art with a focus mostly on unique content, line and contrast.

What’s your inspiration?
Living in New York City, fashion in the first half of the 20th century, The Great Gatsby, black and white contrast and the derby bowler hat are important inspirations.

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatArt by Derek Daniel Reformat
What is art to you?
As in science, where a great research study leads to more questions not necessarily definitive answers, a true example of artwork inspires others to create.

What does your typical day look like?
At this point, it is spent largely in the hospital operating.

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatArt by Derek Daniel ReformatHow have your surroundings influenced your work?
Living in New York City has had a great influence. In fact, the first painting I created (on my own, and not required for a class) in 2007 was based on a perspective I had while studying at New York University on Washington Square.

What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
I hope to inspire others to create pieces of their own. That could be a piece of art, fashion, jewelry, etc.

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatArt by Derek Daniel ReformatWhat do you want others to take away from your work?
See question above.

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
I am one of the artists who was told to “get a real job, a day job first” and took heed of that advice. That is what I am doing now, training as a surgeon. In a sense, it makes it less stressful because I am not financially dependent on creating (and selling) my pieces. I can do it purely for the passion of creating. Nothing else. The downside, of course, is that I am not able to devote all my time to painting.

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatWhat are your thoughts on art school?
Since I am mostly a self-taught painter at this point, largely and regrettably forgetting the various supplies and techniques I used in grade and secondary school, I see value in learning new perspectives and methods. I would consider enrolling someday far from now.

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
To illustrate a cover for the New Yorker magazine.

Art by Derek Daniel ReformatArt by Derek Daniel ReformatWhat art supplies do you use?
Mostly acrylic on canvas. Some of my work online has been modified from an original painting or drawing using Adobe Illustrator to affect the colors, patterns, or duplications, etc.

Find Derek Daniel Reformat’s website website.

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Artist Interview: Amber Michelle Russell – Visual Artist

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

Tell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?
I am a self taught artist residing in Wisconsin. I was born in St. Paul, MN. I’ve always been a creative person. I had my first art exhibit at age eleven and recently had my first solo show “Blood, Sweat, and Tears” at Gallery Sev Ven in Los Angeles in 2014.

How did you get started doing what you do?
I’ve always loved spending my time drawing and painting. I started drawing at the age of three and that obsession grew into my adolescence and matured through adulthood.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

How would you describe your style?
Emotional with darker elements.

What’s your inspiration?
Raw emotions. Sometimes unpleasant ones. Art for me, is like therapy. Releasing the negative with a positive is how I like to describe it.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

What is art to you?
Everything. Intimacy at its core. When you see someone’s art, you are seeing their perspectives­ naked and vulnerable for everyone to see. It’s one of the most beautiful things that we get to experience in this life. For me, I personally can’t function unless I’m spending time drawing or painting. I physically become moody and depressed if I’m unable to work on something creative for long periods of time.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

What does your typical day look like?
I usually have to chart out my days. Mornings are for emailing and updating my website and the evenings are for making art, preparing art for shows, packaging for exhibits or sales.

How long does it typically take for you to finish a piece?
Anywhere from 15­-40 hours, depending on size.

How do you keep motivated?
By challenging myself. I love time alone, so it’s easy for me to get lost in my work.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

How have your surroundings influenced your work?
I live in a smaller city that isn’t very open to the idea of “dark” art. So it has pushed me to focus on the big picture, outside of my comfortable limits­ which in turn, has gotten me a lot further with my art career as a whole.

What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
I hope to create the type of art that stands out, that people can form an emotional connection to, and that grows appreciation for the darker side of beauty.

How have others reacted to your work?
I have received more positive than negative. Numerous people have told me that they have very deep emotional connection to my work and that is probably the best reaction that I’ve received.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

What do you want others to take away from your work?
I want others to feel something when they look at my work. Even if it isn’t a positive reaction, at least it makes them feel something for a short period of time.

What, if anything, would you tell your younger self?
To have thicker skin and to not be so sensitive. Luckily I developed this trait over time, But as a young artist rejection is really hard to deal with.

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?
To work your ass off. And then, work some more. You’re never going to get anywhere in the art world if you don’t work for it.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
Be prepared to get your feelings hurt. Take criticism and learn from it. Put in the time and effort and learn professionalism.

What are your thoughts on art school?
I am self­taught. Art school wasn’t something that I felt I needed to spend my money on. I think it is very useful for techniques and background studies, but the nice thing about being an artist is that you can be self taught and still make it. It is much harder, because you have to learn all of these skills on your own, but it is extremely rewarding. If you have the extra money and require precise training to thrive, I think it’s worth it. If you have a raw unique talent and you can learn marketing skills, you probably can get pretty far without schooling.

illustration by artist, Amber Michelle Russell

What art supplies do you use?
For my mediums: I use coffee, watercolor, graphite, inks, and tea. I enjoy using cold press over hot press and I use a variety of brushes. Trekell brushes are becoming my new favorite.

How could the art industry become better in your opinion?
If chances were taken on unknown fresh artists. A lot of the time the same group of artists are exhibited or publicized. Which is great because they are beyond talented, it just makes it very difficult for the artists that can’t seem to get their foot in the door.

Find Amber Michelle Russell on Facebook, and Instagram.

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Artist Interview: Chloe Hall – Illustrator

Art by Illustrator, Chloe Hall
Tell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?

My name is Chloe Hall, a freelance illustrator based in Leicester. I live on a boat, and I work from my little studio shed, where I do all of my drawing and making! I specialize in line work, embroidery and pattern design. I often mix digital prints with the added detail of hand embroidery, and also create stationery items and soon to be fabric-wares, which I’m really excited about! I did creative subjects throughout school, then went onto do an Art & Design Foundation course, which made me realize I wanted to go into illustration. I didn’t think once that I was going to be a freelance illustrator, it has just sort of happened naturally.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallHow did you get started doing what you do?
I did Graphic Design & Illustration at De Montfort University and luckily had the support from Enterprise Inc. to help me build up my freelance business. I really discovered my style towards the end of uni, and have been developing it ever since. I have always been interested in creative subjects so doing Graphics & Illustration at uni came sort of naturally.

How would you describe your style?
Delicate, quirky and humorous. My work is a mix of illustration and handmade craft. I enjoy having a handmade element into my work, for example incorporating stitch into digital prints and binding my notebooks using my sewing machine, it makes it a little bit more me. My illustrations of women on the beach got a lot of interest from women themselves, and a lot of them enjoyed them simply because they show ‘real women’, I like to think I create work that people can relate to.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallWhat’s your inspiration?
I am a keen observer so people watching is how I get most of my inspiration. People surprise me everyday so a lot of the time peoples’ actions, conversations and their dress sense also inspire me. I also take inspiration from nature, the seaside and fashion.

What does your typical day look like?
I work freelance full time at the moment, so I normally get up, make a cup of tea, and reply to any emails I need to respond to. I then look in my diary to see what needs to be done that day, make another cup of tea, get the biscuit tin and go into my little shed to begin working. I treat my freelance work as my full time job so often I like to socialize in the evenings so I feel refreshed and motivated the next day.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallHow do you keep motivated?
I think keeping motivated is really important, it’s so easy to become unmotivated and I think the best ways to stay motivated are to plan your time effectively and realistically, constantly research new artists, create mood boards regularly and keep doodling! I also find it’s really important to give yourself time to have a break, it’s really refreshing and sometimes I find when I’m not sitting trying to think up ideas, they come to me easier. Sometimes I get a bit frustrated if I stay inside all day so I like to go out everyday if I can, even if it’s just to nip to the shop!

What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
I hope to have a successful range of products selling online and throughout boutiques around the country. In the future I would love to have my patterns and illustrations across a large range of products and selling in high street stores, as well as across clothing and accessories. Not much then? Ha.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallHow have others reacted to your work?
I was lucky enough to exhibit at Pick Me Up in 2014 as part of Codswallop Collective, so that was a great way to get feedback from a wide range of peoples’ opinions on my work, as well as meeting people within the art industry. People have been positive about my pattern work, as well as my hand embroidered prints and compliment my illustrations of people as they have a humorous element. A lot of people were interested in how I create the hand embroidered prints as I stitch into the paper instead of typically stitching into fabric.

What do you want others to take away from your work?
When people see my work I hope it makes them smile! With regards to the products I create, I hope I create keepsakes which people really love and can relate to.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallWhat, if anything, would you tell your younger self?
I would say plan your finances better! I was really excited to jump into creating products straight after uni and I wish I had planned all my products financially before creating them, instead of buying everything at once like an idiot. Saying that, I’m glad I have done everything I have with regards to illustration, as I am really focused this year and know what I need to do.

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?
‘If you’re not enjoying it you’re doing it wrong!’ Said by Ian Newsham, one of my tutors at university.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallAny words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
Enter all the competitions that will benefit you, send out mailers to design agencies and companies to get your work noticed, never stop doodling and make sure you create a good plan for the year ahead of you as well as SMART goals. Also don’t be scared to approach people, your works not going to sell if it is sitting in your studio in a box, even if they don’t want to stock or buy your work they will probably have some great advice to give you.

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
I am currently working on a product range which will be released towards the beginning of April. I hope to create two product ranges a year, which will include exclusive embroidery prints, stationery items and a one off fabric product to accompany each range. This fabric item will be different each time and relate to each product range so the element of surprise will be an important part of each product range! I hope to attend more events and markets this year so I’m currently looking at which ones will benefit me the best.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallWhat’s your dream project?
This is hard! I think I would love to create patterns which would be put across clothing and accessories for a well known brand, it’s nice to know people buy your prints, greeting cards, etc. but often you don’t get to see where they end up. I would love to walk past someone in the street who was wearing an item of clothing with my designs on it!

What art supplies do you use?
My most used art supplies are probably my fine liners and embroidery thread.

Art by Illustrator, Chloe HallAny other artists that you would like to recommend for others to check out as well?
Yes… William Wright, Damon Smith, Sarah Glover, Danielle Doobay & Pedro Demetriou. I am in a collective called Codswallop and these are my fellow Codswallops.

Find Chloe Hall on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Etsy.

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Designer Interview: Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtTell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?
Boo and Boo Factory was founded by me, Christina Anton, as a way to create unique leather jewelry that you just can’t find anywhere else. The forms, shapes, colors, and patterns are all inspired by my training in architecture. All pieces are handmade from my Chicago studio with love and attention to detail. I specialize in statement necklaces, bold neon earrings, and bright color bracelets which combine techniques ranging from hand painted, hand cut, beaded, and woven materials. I love mixing patterns, prints, color, and form. I have been an architectural designer since 2006, working in various architecture firms in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles. I graduated with an architecture degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago where I learned many computer and fabrication techniques that have greatly influenced my designs. After recently graduating with a master degree from the Southern California Institute of Architecture, where I gained a penchant for color and texture, as well as advanced computer modeling, animation, and cutting edge fabrication techniques ranging from laser cut, CNC, and 3D printing. I discovered I had a love of small object design. This inspired me to take my growing jewelry design business and pursue it full time.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtHow did you get started doing what you do?
I just jumped in! I’ve always made things since I was little so it’s a real passion for me. I love fashion and bright colors and patterns so it was only natural for me to start making jewelry. I started Boo and Boo Factory when I was in graduate school to help me pay for supplies and my 3D printed models. When I graduated, it had grown so much that I decided not to work in architecture but to work for myself.

How would you describe your style?
I love to wear lots of patterns and mix and match different elements to create a unique style. I actually wear a lot of black and then I’ll add a bright pop of color with accessories.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtWhat’s your inspiration?
I am inspired by textile art. I am also inspired by the colors and materials I use.

What is art to you?
Art is anything that you are passionate about. It’s an intimate expression of who you are, how you see the world, and where you are at in your life. Art is for everyone, a basic human need for beauty.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtWhat does your typical day look like?
I don’t have a set schedule, I just go with the flow. Everyday I make something new, well at least I try to. I have so many ideas of new pieces and new product lines that sometimes it’s overwhelming. As much as I’d love to just create all day, there’s so much that goes into running a business. I have to wear many hats such as marketing, accounting, research, pricing, wholesale, web design, SEO, shipping, sourcing supplies, etc. It seems like there’s never enough time in the day! But the great thing about what I do is that I love it, especially the part of being my own boss. I never thought that I’d be able to do something I truly love for a living and I’m so grateful for that. Plus I get to talk and network with people from around the globe. Everyday is so exciting because I never know what to expect or what new thing I’m going to learn.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtHow long does it typically take for you to finish a piece?
Depending on the size and intricacy of the piece, it can take anywhere from 30 minutes up to 3 to 4 hours. I take a lot of pride in the quality and craftsmanship of my work and each one is made with a lot of love.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtHow do you keep motivated?
Seeing my pieces being mailed to customers all over the world is my inspiration. Connecting with other creatives keeps my creative mind flowing. Also, I challenge myself by trying to create more unique and intricate designs. I am always learning new techniques and applying them to my work so that my line is fresh and always evolving.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtHow have others reacted to your work?
The reaction is love it or hate it. Some people just don’t get it while others are crazy about it. I never want the reaction to my work to be passive.

What do you want others to take away from your work?
I want to be memorable as a brand. Whether you like my work or not, I hope that my pieces will be recognized for their originality.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtWhat’s the best advice you’ve been given?
Don’t worry about what others are doing. I think as a creative it’s easy to compare yourself to other people. But the truth is, everyone is different and it’s not worth it. Just do the best you can, be true to yourself and keep working hard. Authenticity is key.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtAny words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
If you want to do something you love for a living, you have to make lots of sacrifices. Having a creative business is not easy and I work more now that I did at any architecture firm. Make sure you research and learn as much as you can about business as well as progressing in your craft. Just keep creating and get your work out there.

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
I’m working on a 3D printed jewelry line which I hope to launch later this year. I’m really excited about it, particularly printing in gold and silver. The pieces will be derived from my architectural portfolio.

Christina Anton of Boo and Boo Factory Jewelry ArtAny other artists that you would like to recommend for others to check out as well?
There’s a few! I love Denise Reytan’s colorful mixed media jewelry. I also love Shayna Leib. She does amazing glassblowing art. Britt Bass is another artist I follow. Her paintings are amazing with great compositions and inspirational color palettes.

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Artist Interview: Michele Tassinar – Photographer

Michele Tassinar photography
Tell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?
My name is Michele Tassinari and I’m 42 years old. I live in Italy (Finale Emilia so close to Modena and Bologna). I am employed in a graphic design studio, I deal with photographic productions.

How did you get started doing what you do?
I started taking pictures after I was given a toy camera. From there it was pure love for photography. I hope not to disappoint this important art form and observation!

Michele Tassinar photography
How would you describe your style?
Simple, full of flaws but poetic, I think.

What’s your inspiration?
First of all,  the sun and the light that surrounds our every day landscapes and things in general. That and movies, movies and movies….

Michele Tassinar photography
What is art to you?
Expression of sensibility. Everything that you want to communicate to others.

How long does it typically take for you to finish a piece?
Just enough time for one click! And the time required to develop and print my photos, of course. Working exclusively in analog.

Michele Tassinar photography
How do you keep motivated?
Be curious, always…

How have your surroundings influenced your work?
Constantly and I make sure that my eyes are able to see more things as possible.

Michele Tassinar photography
What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
Entertain and make people linger while stimulating their beautiful thoughts.

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
I need words of wisdom for me as well!

What are your thoughts on art school?
Necessary to process and accumulate knowledge. Knowledge removes man from fear and ignorance. Education is a sacred right for every human being and art is essential to better understanding the processes that have accompanied and will accompany the evolution of human behavior.

Michele Tassinar photography
Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
Many and I’m trying to order them. I will keep you updated.

What’s your dream project?
It has partly came true. I work with my best friends and every day we try to always do our best.

Michele Tassinar photography
What art supplies do you use?
Expired Kodak films.

How could the art industry become better in your opinion?
If I think of the condition of art in Italy… well I would have to say… in a negative way… But things are changing here. In general I think it’s important to give space to all those who really have something to say, create less competition that could prove unproductive and jam any individual creative process. And social media are also used for this, no?

This is my opinion, however…

Any other artists that you would like to recommend for others to check out as well?
Derek Jarman, always.

Follow Michele Tassinari, on Tumblr and Twitter!

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Photographer Interview: Jarred Tennell

Jarred Tennell PhotographyTell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?
I’m a 20 year old photographer, born in Dallas, Texas. I’m a photo student, designer, and co-founder of Evlvd Minds art collective.

How did you get started doing what you do?
After the Evlvd Minds was founded, we brought in Emiliano Sosa, a videographer/photographer, to help strengthen the brands arsenal. He was the first person to put a dslr camera in my hands. From then on my interest in photography has continued to grow.

Jarred Tennell PhotographyHow would you describe your style?
Hmm I’d say my style is still has a lot of developing to do, but I can notice the difference or originality in my photography compared to photographers found on social media.

What’s your inspiration?
Most definitely music, it’s like a religion to me.

What is art to you?
A second chance. Sports originally was my main focus, but all good things come to an end. That is when I found art. It was a new way for me to display my ambition and drive that I gained from sports.

Jarred Tennell PhotographyHow do you keep motivated?
Spending time with my guys from “EM”. They all have individual talents that I truly admire. We kind of feed off each other and inspire one another.

What do you hope to accomplish with your work?
First, I want to reach peace with myself through my work. You know, just being able to sit back and say “I did it” is enough for me. But in a more selfless view, I’d like to inspire others. Not just artist, but anyone who carries passion for whatever they are into.

Jarred Tennell PhotographyHow have others reacted to your work?
I get so much positive feedback when I show my work to others, and its extremely humbling. Photography is still fresh to me, so knowing people enjoy my work is pleasing.

What do you want others to take away from your work?
Ha, hopefully they’ll see that you don’t have to fall into any trend or image to be successful. Basically be you, and love yourself first.

Jarred Tennell PhotographyWhat, if anything, would you tell your younger self?
Wow… there is so much I would go back and tell myself. For sure to take more risks and worry about the outcomes later, and not to worry about how others may see or think of me.

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?
“Slow grind is good grind”

Jarred Tennell PhotographyAny words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
It’s not the camera, its the photographer. You don’t need the most expensive camera to produce impactful photos.

What are your thoughts on art school?
It really depends on the person. School is not for everyone. Some people need an instructor to push them, and some people can be held back by school. Me personally, I enjoy taking classes. Mainly because I can choose the classes I’m interested in. I hated high school because I did not have that freedom. Art school can give you a chance to meet people in the same creative field you are in, and they may have the right connections you need to reach the next level.

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
I would love to produce and publish physical copies of magazines I shoot. And to shoot an entire Evlvd Minds lookbook.

Jarred Tennell PhotographyWhat’s your dream project?
Directing my own film. Haha, I plan on picking up where Quentin Tarantino will have eventually left off.

What art supplies do you use?
Canon 5D Mark ll
Canon AE­1 Program
Canon AE­1

Jarred Tennell PhotographyAny other artists that you would like to recommend for others to check out as well?
These are a few photographers that inspire me.
Eris Jerome
Amber Asaly
Amber Asaly

Follow Jarred Tennell on his TumblrEvlved Minds Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, and Behance!

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Artist Interview: Elfriede – Illustrator

Elfriede Art IllustrationTell us about yourself, who are you, where are you from, and what do you do?
I am Lilly Friedeberg or “Elfriede” (25 years old) and I am a Berlin based illustrator, designer, and recently I also get the chance to work/assist as a set designer and stop motion animator.

I love collecting vinyl toys, all kinds of stop-motion movies, flea markets, the internet-tumblr-world, and collaborating with other artists or sketching for hours while dreaming of weird candy worlds and outer spaces.

Elfriede Art IllustrationHow would you describe your style?
It’s always hard for me to describe what I am doing, but I want to try to explain.. I grew up with a big influence from Nintendo and Disney. I was in love with Mario and Yoshi. I loved those cute but also weird places you can hide for a while. Today I don’t play that much anymore but I still like to escape sometimes to colorful candy places! So I need to create my own worlds. :)

I always try to combine corny elements with weird or even a bit basely things. I would say I have a really dark and ironic humor which I always want to find in my work. Something can look so funny, friendly, and bright at the first sight and so mean and wrong on the second. For me its also important to not have this good guy/bad guy Disney image. I like characters that are good and evil and the same time :)

My illustrations also have a strong graphic influence. I like to draw icons and patterns. And I think its obvious that I am a bit addicted to candy colors!

Elfriede Art Illustration

What’s your inspiration?
My inspirations… I think there are several.

I get a lot of inspiration from the tumblr world. I created a reblog blog. I started to collect what I like and it helped me to understand me and my work better. I think that’s really important to my work. I see my work sometimes also like a way of editing everything that I saw into something new.

Then, of course, friends and other artists are a big inspiration for me.

I am inspired from the lowbrow art scene, Japanese manga and toys, Nintendo, food packages, and old board games.

Elfriede Art Illustration

How long does it typically take for you to finish a piece?
It depends. Some pieces took of course longer than others. When I start a new illustration I normally draw a few versions until I am content, and than I choose one. I always start with a really rough sketch to have a plan in my mind.

How do you keep motivated?
That’s a good question. Sometimes I look at old illustrations I did and compare them with new ones. That really helps me, because I am really critical with myself. And when I see that I improve my style and techniques, I get motivated to go on and on.

For me, an also interesting aspect is the whole social network. On the one hand, its a big motivation and it helps you to connect and show your work to a bigger audience. But at the same time it can sometimes be really hard to not lose yourself if you see all this great artist out there. It’s important for me to try to get better, but at the same time to just have fun with what I’m doing and don’t take myself too seriously. ;)

And of course the feedback from my friends, family, and other creative people is really important and motivating for me!

Elfriede Art Illustration

What’s the best advice you’ve been given?
Do something you really like, concentrate and be serious for ten years, and you will become really good!

What are your thoughts on art school?
I think there are some really good schools for design and art but honestly, I think for me it was more important to be in the right city (in my case Berlin) and to meet the right people. A city like Berlin can give you so much inspiration and show you all the great work of other artists from all over the world. This really helped me to find a way into my own style. There is also a lot to be learned at university, but in the end it’s what applies to everything: it’s what you get out of it. Of course a great university can show you a way, but you need to learn to motivate yourself as well.

Elfriede Art Illustration

Have any future aspirations that you’d like to share?
I hope I will be able to travel a lot and to see and discover more!

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
I am still in the beginning and I also still learn a lot. But so far I can say: you really need to believe in what you are doing, work hard on it, and stay focused. I guess this is the typical answer, but it’s so true! And I have one good advice: Always finish a painting/illustration. Even when you realize in the middle of the process you don’t like it anymore. Finish it! :) You can always learn something from it and keep good elements for the next one.

Elfriede Art Illustration

Any other artists that you would like to recommend for others to check out as well?
I really like the honest, bright, and weird snapshot analog photos from my friend Resi, the great Fashion Label, “IndyAnna” and their little store in Berlin is always a inspiration for me! marco the graphic designer, and the work from Kohlen Pott.

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